Charcot Marie Tooth Disease and Breathing Problems

Posted by on Apr 27, 2019 in Health | 0 comments

Charcot Marie Tooth Disease and Breathing Problems

Charcot-Marie-Tooth, usually known as CMT, is one of the most inherited neurological disorder. It affects the peripheral nervous system. The symptoms that are observed include loss of muscle and sensation in various parts of the body. It is a long term progressive disorder that may also make,  speaking or swallowing difficult. You can visit barklystreetdental.com.au to get information on how to manage it.

Charcot Marie Tooth Disease and breathing problems

Charcot marie tooth disease and breathing problems come together as the diaphragm is innervated by the nephric nerve. Proper breathing requires coordination of several muscles like the diaphragm, bulbar muscles, inter-coastal muscles, and abdominal muscles. When these muscles are damaged in CMT, the ability of breathing is compromised. When the nephric nerve stops functioning properly, symptoms like weakness, postural discomfort, sleep apnea, etc are observed.

Signs of breathing problems include weak cough and hypercapnia

Hypercapnia is a condition in which your body retent carbon dioxide. This is usually observed during the night. when you lie flat. The abdomen compresses the diaphragm and full expansion of the chest is not achieved for breathing. This results in incomplete exhalation of carbon dioxide. This causes fatigue, restlessness, concentration issues and headaches. In intense conditions of carbon dioxide buildup, you may even black out and lose consciousness. charcot marie tooth disease and breathing problems

A BiPAP machine can be used at night for natural breathing and helps in taking deep breaths while sleeping. This helps in exhaling the excess carbon dioxide. Ventilator support is needed when the condition worsens.

Weak cough is caused by weak respiratory muscles. When the patient doesn’t have an effective cough, this causes the mucus to build up in the lungs. This causes bacteria to be trapped in the lungs and prevents the flow of oxygen into the lungs. This can be overcome by assisted coughing by someone else or a machine called Cough Assist.

Even though charcot marie tooth disease and breathing problem is rarely fatal, it can prove to be life-threatening. Timely treatment can prevent it from getting worse and regain your health.

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Thunderstorm Asthma

Posted by on Apr 26, 2019 in Respiratory problems | 0 comments

Thunderstorm Asthma

Asthma is a problem associated with breathing whereby it becomes difficult for the patient to breathe in air. During a thunderstorm, the dust pollen count in the air rises exponentially. This can lead to an asthma attack which is called thunderstorm asthma. The broken pollen particles are extremely small in size and can be inhaled easily. It is not an easy task to keep these harmful particles away from your lungs. Ones they are inhaled for a longer period of time they could lead to extreme problems related to the lungs. It is highly recommended to contact a specialist right away as this can create breathing complications not only to asthma patients but also to those who don’t have any history of asthma attack.

The symptoms can be shortness of breath, congestion around chest, cough and rapid breathing. One can feel complete loss of breath during as asthmatic attack and if the patient is not treated immediately then it can prove to be fatal also. In some situation the color of face and lips also turns pale. If any such condition arises then you must rush for medical support. thunderstorm asthma

Inhalers can be used to bring relief during an attack. In some critical cases medication is required. Some pills can be useful if inhalers aren’t helping.  As it is said “prevention is better than cure”. One must be very cautious during a weather change especially during thunderstorms or windy weather. If possible one should remain indoors and close all the windows till the bad weather subsides. Masks can be of great help for people with asthma history and even for people without any such medical history. Keeping these things in mind, complications related to the lungs can be avoided and thunderstorm asthma can be fought. Breathing exercises are also helpful in strengthening of the lungs thereby helping to fight against any of the diseases related to the respiratory system.

Thunderstorm asthma patients has been very few in the past but their numbers are increasing day by day and now they can be found across the different continents of the world.

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Emphysema Stages

Posted by on Mar 9, 2019 in Health | 0 comments

Emphysema Stages

Emphysema is a serious lung condition commonly caused by smoking. With emphysema, your air sacs, commonly known as alveoli weakens and they are unable to contract after expansion. Also, air is trapped in alveoli, and this causes some to break. The condition makes breathing difficult and severely reduce the amount of oxygen absorbed in your blood stream. Nevertheless, there’s a better chance of survival if one gets to contact a specialist before it reaches the worst stage.

Emphysema occurs slowly and in stages. 80% of victims happens due to many years of smoking tobacco. It may also develop due to air pollution, marijuana smoking, chemical fumes or secondhand smoking. Once the condition occurs, it can’t be reversed.

Symptoms of emphysema

Most victims don’t feel the symptoms until there is 50% or more damage to lung tissues. The symptoms usually appear gradually. They include.emphysema stages

Coughing

Chest tightness

Wheezing

Shortness of breath

More mucus production

Other symptoms include weight loss and poor appetite.

4 Emphysema stages

There are four stages of emphysema. The doctor determines the stages depending on your symptoms and breathing tests results. They include

At-risk
Your breathing test is okay. However, you have some mild symptoms like increased mucus production and ongoing coughing.

Early or mild stage
Your breathing test shows that there is a tender airflow blockage. You also have symptoms such as non-stop coughs and more mucus production. At these stages, you can’t feel the effects of air flow reduction.

Moderate
Moderate is the stage where most people now realize they have a serious lung condition. Here, you feel a decline or reduction of airflow. Main symptoms include shortness of breath, especially after physical activity.

Very severe
This is the final stage of emphysema. Breathing test shows that there is severely limited air flow.

The severity of emphysema depends on how early it’s treated. The earlier you get treated, the better the outcomes. If left untreated, the condition may lead to serious complications such as holes in the lungs, collapsed lungs and heart problem. Although the condition is irreversible, treatment is better to slow progression and quality of your life.

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What is Asthmatic Bronchitis?

Posted by on Mar 5, 2019 in Health | 0 comments

What is Asthmatic Bronchitis?

Asthmatic Bronchitis, also called bronchial asthma, is a condition in which a person’s air passageways, called bronchial tubes, become inflamed. Every time we breathe in, the air enters through our nose and goes through a series of airways branching and eventually terminating in our lungs. In the case of a person suffering from asthmatic bronchitis, these airways become narrowed and swollen because of the production of excessive mucus. This makes it difficult for the air to reach the lungs. With less air entering the lungs, sufferers often feel short of breath and wheeze or cough in an attempt to get more air flowing through the restricted pathways. Sufferers need to be rushed for immediate medical help ASAP.

It helps to understand the anatomy of our respiratory system in order to clearly grasp what this condition encompasses. After we inhale air through the nose, it passes down to the trachea via the upper airways. The trachea, or windpipe, branches into two large tubes called bronchi. Then, inside the lungs, bronchi branch into smaller air pipes called bronchioles. Finally, air from the bronchioles moves into tiny air sacks called alveoli where gas exchange takes place.

Asthma and bronchitis are two separate respiratory conditions with what is asthmatic bronchitissimilar symptoms. Asthma is a respirational illness that prevents normal air flow from outside to the alveoli of the lungs. It is caused due to the contracting of smooth muscles around the airways and swelling that narrows the passage of air. Acute bronchitis, also called chest cold, is a temporary inflammation of the bronchi in the lungs. It is most commonly caused due to bacterial or viral infections. The same viruses that are responsible for common cold can cause acute bronchitis in susceptible individuals.

When acute bronchitis and asthma occur together, the condition is known as asthmatic bronchitis. The usual symptoms include tightness or congestion in the chest, wheezing, coughing, soreness of throat, and shortness of breath. The most common triggers for asthmatic bronchitis include:

•Tobacco smoke
•Pollution
•Viral or bacterial infections
•Excessive exercise
•Weather changes
•Allergens such as dust or pollen
•Chemicals
•Certain medications

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Risk Factors For Respiratory Failure

Posted by on Nov 6, 2018 in Featured | 0 comments

Risk Factors For Respiratory Failure

The condition in which the lungs can not perform the gas exchange function correctly during rest and exercise is called respiratory failure. Respiratory failure is divided into type I and type II. It can be acute or chronic.

Respiratory failure is a common cause of death. You should consult your doctors or go visit the blog of HomeDoctorsSydney medical team if you notice an early sign of respiratory failure. If it’s not treated at an early stage, major illnesses and problems can occur.

Risk factors for respiratory failure

– Alterations in the mechanics of the chest wall: severe kyphoscoliosis, obesity, flail injury with multiple rib fractures, paralysis of the thoracic muscle and diaphragm, immobility of the chest wall, as in progressive systemic sclerosis

– Pleural disorders: large pleural fluid, pneumothorax and dissemination, significant thickening of the pleura

– Respiratory diseases: severe asthma, chronic bronchitis, and emphysema, laryngeal edema, mechanical obstruction of the respiratory tract

– Pulmonary diseases: interstitial pulmonary fibrosis, neonatal syndrome and respiratory distress syndrome in adults, allergic alveolitis, extensive malignant tumor, bilateral lung inflammation

– Pulmonary vascular disease: primary pulmonary hypertension, polyarteritis nodosa, repetitive pulmonary embolism

– Metabolic alkalosis

– Depression of the respiratory center: intracranial tension, narcotic intoxication.

– One of the problems encountered in patients with respiratory failure while maintaining assisted breathing is the premature closure of the airways during expiration, which causes reddening of the air. This is avoided by maintaining a positive final pressure. In addition, it helps to reopen the bronchi and alveoli that remain closed. The breathing of the tides has improved. The positive expiratory pressure of the extremities also helps in the reduction of functional pulmonary valves.

– The use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenators is investigated to control severe hypoxemic respiratory failure when conventional methods fail. When the patient improves, they find soft exercises. Breathing exercises should increase tidal volume and aid in expectoration.

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