Posted by on Jun 15, 2019 in Respiratory problems | 0 comments

Dentists Lung Disease

A rare lung disease known as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) seems to be affecting dentists and dental technicians. CDC (Center of Disease Control and Prevention) researchers have discovered a group of dentists diagnosed with this disease, also known as dentist’s lung disease, leading the CDC to caution that dentists and dental technicians will be at a greater risk of contracting IPF. Visit http://dreppingdentists.com.au/ Services for more information.

Dust particle inhalation

Although no conclusive source has been detected, the polishing of dental tools and prepping chemical compounds used in filings seem to be factored in the likelihood of developing the disease especially when the actions are carried out without protective gear and in enclosed spaces.

These actions are capable of releasing dust particulates that have been shown to affect the respiratory system adversely.

When it comes to IPF, these dust particles in the lungs can thicken select portions of the lungs, increasing the difficulty of breathing. The general prognosis of IPF is near fatal, with afflicted people given three to five years to live after the IPF has been diagnosed. According to Dr. Randall Nett, from the CDCs respiratory health division, some patients have been known to live as long as ten years.

Increasing safety

dentists lung diseaseThe IPF diagnosis isn’t usually made until the patients are in their 50s, 60s, or 70s. The risk of contracting IPF is cause for concern. However, there is good news.

The dentist now works less with materials that require polishing and, during the polishing process, release the aerosolized dust particles that cause IPF. Hence, exposure to the primary cause is reduced.

Also, external laboratories with quality controls and safety standards are used to perform riskier tasks that the dentist used to do. Dental offices can further install devices that monitor the compounds in the air and detect trace vapors that can harm lungs in the long-term after exposure.

But dentists also need to be careful in the workspace. Masks and gloves should be used during medical procedures, and the office should be vacuumed regularly to eliminate the dust particles.

The CDC notes that protection agencies like the FDA (Food and Drug Administration) do well to reduce side-effects of drugs and medical procedures on patients but not so much when it concerns health providers. Dental education should also include personal safety information to keep dentists safe from dentists lung disease.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

15 − 14 =