Difficulty Breathing After General Anesthesia

Posted by on Jul 26, 2019 in Respiratory problems | 0 comments

Difficulty Breathing After General Anesthesia

We’ve all been in that dark place. Regardless of the surgery, the problematic breathing is always the same. Anesthesia – at least for the most part- is a blessed game-changing piece of medicine. No longer will we suffer from painful dental incisions or procedures. Those dental treatments and the tools used in every treatment won’t give us quite the scare anymore.  Thanks to anesthesia. Although not all dental tools can be nerve-racking. You can see all types of them when you check at /www.dentalhandpiece.com.au/shop/ the available products.

While general anesthesia can be a lifesaver, it has some back-biting side effects and the most notorious of them all has to be the difficulty breathing after general anesthesia. This article explores anesthesia itself, how the difficulty breathing after general anesthesia happens and a couple more side effects to look out for.

Anesthesia, or at least the type involved in most dental procedures, are just local anesthesia. The area of the mouth that the surgery is involved in is numbed. Local anesthesia is used often along with side nitrous oxide – which is the laughing gas like substance used to relax and calm you. Oral pre-medication pills is another more potent form of anesthesia. The effects of this are often unpredictable, so you will need to be escorted to and fro from the office. It is inexpensive for the doctors and only needs to be taken half to full hour before the appointment. There are more severe forms of anesthesia but mentioned above are the main ones.

Side effects of general anesthesia include: difficulty breathing after general anesthesia

Momentarily memory loss and confusion

Difficulty in the toilet (especially when passing urine)

Shivering

Sore throat due to the breathing tube

The main side effect of the anesthesia involved in dental surgeries is the difficulty in breathing afterward. It usually occurs after chest or abdominal surgeries; however, it can occur after dental surgery. It arises directly because of the breathing tube; this also causes a sore throat. If this is the case, you should expect your body to avoid the pain by preventing breathing naturally. This can be extremely dangerous, as breathing expels the mucus from your mouth. If it stays in your mouth, it will become infected posing a more threatening issue. Furthermore, the act of avoiding breathing can also lead to suffocation.

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How to do Holotropic Breathing Alone

Posted by on Jul 23, 2019 in Featured | 0 comments

How to do Holotropic Breathing Alone

In its purest form, holotropic breathing is a practice and set of techniques in which we consciously control our breathing to achieve a higher emotional and mental state. It is commonly practiced in relation to relaxing ourselves and lifting up our state daily. The good news is, you can easily learn how to do holotropic breathing alone in your daily life.

Usually breathing is just something “we do”, without thinking too much about it. There are many routines and ways to go about it, but essentially the goal is to take deep, fast breaths and to manually take control of your breathing patterns to achieve higher states of consciousness.

Basic Technique – How to do Holotropic Breathing Alone

how to do holotropic breathing aloneSit or lie down in a comfortable position. Start out small, maybe 30 to 60 minutes, and relax your entire body, close your eyes. Your surroundings should be free of noise and distractions. Start taking very deep, quick breaths in through the mouth, and exhaling methodically through the nose. Try to make it both fast and deep, to your comfort.

Start out with whatever you are capable of doing and work your way up to as deep breathing as possible.

If you prefer, you can try the alternate way of breathing in through your nose. In a controlled manner, breath in slowly through your nose and slowly increase the intensity of the breaths, deeper and faster as you progress, this can take up to 30 minutes. Working your way up, you should now be at a constant rhythm of breathing in and out deeply and rapidly.

Try to clear your mind of thoughts, emotions, and distractions.

Holotropic breathwork helps you sharpen your consciousness and is said to help deal with anxious states, depression, and addiction, and is a great daily routine used as either a supplement to or alternative to meditation sessions.

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